Aviation

Ray Douglas Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Illinoi
Ray Douglas Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Illinoi
Ray Douglas Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Illinois on August 22,1920. He was the third born son of Leonard Spauldling Bradbury and Esther Marie Moberg Bradbury. In the fall of 1926 the Bradbury family moved from their home in Waukegan to Tucson, Arizona. However, their stay there only lasted until May of 1927 when they moved back to their original habitation. Bradbury began writing his own literature on butcher paper when he was 11 years old. Ray and his family moved again moved to Tucson, Ari
Ray Bradbury
Ray Bradbury
Ray Bradbury It was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened and changed. With the brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history. With his symbolic helmet numbered 451 on his stolid head, and his eyes all orange flame with the though
Vietnamization and its Effects
Vietnamization and its Effects
Vietnamization and its Effects Vietnamization and it\'s Lasting Effects on South Vietnam and it\'s Fall Outline I. Background A. Introduction B. Vietnam -- two separate countries 1. French Control 2. Viet Minh Revolt 3. Creation of North and South Vietnam C. America\'s objectives in South Vietnam D. Vietnam\'s armies II. Vietnamization A. Beginnings of Vietnamization B. Research of possible withdrawal C. Decision to withdraw 1. began in early 1969 III. American Withdrawal and South Vietnamese Bu
America’s involvement in World War Two
America’s involvement in World War Two
America’s involvement in World War Two When war broke out , there was no way the world could possibly know the severity of this guerre. Fortunately one country saw and understood that Germany and its allies would have to be stopped. America’s Involvement in World War two not only contributed in the eventual downfall of the insane Adolph Hitler and his Third Reich, but also came at the precise time and moment. Had the united states entered the war any earlier the consequences might have been wor
The Battle at Midway
The Battle at Midway
The Battle at Midway Nothing distinguished the dawn of June 2, 1942, from countless other dawns that had fallen over tiny Midway atoll in the North Pacific. Nothing, that is, except the tension, the electric tension of men waiting for an enemy to make his move. On Midway\'s two main islands, Sand and Eastern, 3,632 United States Navy and Marine Corps personnel, along with a few Army Air Force aircrews, stood at battle stations in and near their fighters, bombers, and seaplanes, waiting for the J
World War I Powers
World War I Powers
World War I Powers During World War I many different types of weapons were utilized by both the Allied and Central powers. Some were variations on older models of weaponry, and others were totally new inventions created to aid in the wartime effort. Most of the new weapons were used as killing machines in trench warfare, which was practiced during World War I, while others were employed as tools of espionage, scouting land areas, or air and sea warfare. Communication also played a major role in
College Degrees
College Degrees
College Degrees INTRODUCTION Many adults who graduate from high school immediately enter careers that do not require a college degree. Indeed, the majority of the adult population of the United States of America does not have college degrees. And the lack of degree is not a stigma. Vocations usually do not require degrees. Certainly the many trade vocations in the building industry do not require college degrees, but instead either vocational training, on-the-job training, and combinations of bo
Airplane Warfare During World War I
Airplane Warfare During World War I
Airplane Warfare During World War I During World War One, the role of airplanes and how they were used changed greatly. At first planes were only used for sport, but people started realize that not only could airplanes be useful but they could even influence an outcome of the war greatly. Soon the war was filled with blimps, planes, and tethered balloons. By the end of the war, planes became a symbol of fear, but they were not always treated with such respect. In the time leading up to the war,