Conservative Democrat

John Fitzgerald Kennedy
John Fitzgerald Kennedy
John Fitzgerald Kennedy John Fitzgerald Kennedy 35th president of the United States, the youngest person ever to be elected president. He was also the first Roman Catholic president and the first president to be born in the 20th century. Kennedy was assassinated before he completed his third year as president. Therefore his achievements were limited. Nevertheless, his influence was worldwide, and his handling of the Cuban Missile Crisis may have prevented war. Young people especially liked him.
All-American Boy
All-American Boy
All-American Boy By: Eng. 102 Section 5541 Crapsi Combination Outline Introduction Revue of Sources Body: Thesis: Ronald Dutch Reagan is an elite kind of person that believed in perseverance and hard work and doing what had to be done, even if it meant a low approval rating. I. From Dutch to Ronald II. Hollywood to Governor III. Reaganomics Response Conclusion Works Cited Introduction Somewhere at sometime a philosopher once said, The world is divided into two kinds of people: those who are s
Government in India, Today
Government in India, Today
Government in India, Today India\'s present constitution went into effect on Jan. 26, 1950. At that time, the nation changed its status from a dominion to a federal republic, though it remained within the Commonwealth. A president, chosen by an Electoral College replaced the governor-general, appointed by the British Crown. The president is the official chief of state, but the office is largely ceremonial. In parliamentary government, the people in a country elect members of at least one house o
Why Presidentialism is Undesirable in a Newly Foun
Why Presidentialism is Undesirable in a Newly Foun
Why Presidentialism is Undesirable in a Newly Founded Democracy: Brazil\'s Struggle to Liberalize Brazil\'s transformation from an authoritarian regime to a presidential democracy was a slow and faltered attempt. From the early suggestions of democratic development, there were both administrations that contributed to democratic growth, as well as administrations that opposed this liberalization. This led to an instability in the Brazilian form of democratic government, their economy, and their p
The 1930ís: The Good Times and The Bad Times
The 1930ís: The Good Times and The Bad Times
The 1930ís: The Good Times and The Bad Times The decade of the 1930ís can be characterized in two parts: The Great Depression, and the restoration of the American economy. America had been completely destroyed due to the Stock Market Crash of 1929. It was up to the government and people of the 1930ís to mend Americaís wounds. One man stood up to this challenge, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. He promised to fix the American economy, provide jobs, and help the needy. During The Great Depression, the
Thomas Woodrow Wilson
Thomas Woodrow Wilson
Thomas Woodrow Wilson Thomas Woodrow Wilson, twenty-eighth president of the United States, might have suffered from dyslexia. He never could read easily, but developed a strong power of concentration and a near-photographic memory. The outbreak of World War I coincided with the death of Wilson\'s first wife Ellen Axson, who he was passionately devoted to. Seven months after her death his friends introduced him to Edith Bolling Galt, a descendant of the Indian princess Pocahontas, they were marri
Government Spending & Budget
Government Spending & Budget
Government Spending & Budget As many Federal departments and agencies lurch into an era of running without funds, the leaders of both parties of Congress are spending less and less time searching for a compromise to balance the budget, and more and more time deciding how to use it to their advantage on the campaign trail. Meanwhile money is easily borrowed to pay for government overhead. In an attempt to change this, on June 29, Congress voted in favor of HConRes67 that called for a 7 year plan
Term Limits in U.S. Government
Term Limits in U.S. Government
Term Limits in U.S. Government Mark P. Petracca\'s idea that government should be kept as near to the people as possible chiefly through frequent elections and rotation-in-office is quite common in early republican thought and generally agreed upon by the America\'s revolutionary thinkers. Although the debate over limiting legislative terms dates back to the beginnings of political science, it was not until the 1990\'s that the doctrine began to be taken seriously when voters started to approv
Juidical Review
Juidical Review
Juidical Review In 1717, Bishop Hoadly told King George I, Whoever hath an absolute authority to interpret written or spoken laws; it is he who is truly the lawgiver to all intents and purposes and not the person who wrote or spoke them (Pollack, 153). Early sentiments similar these have blossomed in to a large scale debate over which branch of our government has the power to overturn laws that do not follow the foundations of our democratic system; the constitution. In this paper I will discu
Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt Outline Thesis: Theodore Roosevelt\'s political presence altered the course of the United States, transforming it into a superpower fully ready to handle the challenges of any opposition, and changed the role of the president and executive branch of US government, making it a force to be reckoned with. I. Introduction II. Before Roosevelt A. Post-Reconstructionist Views B. The Industrial Revolution C. The Gilded Age 1. Railroads 2. Robber Barons 3. Immigration 4. Standard Ques
Southern Voting Behavior
Southern Voting Behavior
Southern Voting Behavior Southern Voting behavior since the 1960ís Voters in many areas of the U.S. are apt to vote differently as a whole from election to election. The nation has also had a decreased turnout rate for the presidential and local elections. The South has typically not followed these patterns that the rest of has seemed to be following. The Southern whites of the U.S. have typically followed and voted for the more conservative candidate and party. Where as the Southern blacks have
Indian Removal
Indian Removal
Indian Removal INTRODUCTION On May 26, 1830, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 was passed by the Twenty-First Congress of the United states of America. After four months of strong debate, Andrew Jackson signed the bill into law. Land greed was a big reason for the federal government\'s position on Indian removal. This desire for Indian lands was also abetted by the Indian hating mentallity that was peculiar to some American frontiersman. This period of forcible removal first started with the Cherok
The Fall of Germany in World War I
The Fall of Germany in World War I
The Fall of Germany in World War I None of the European power wanted World War I, but they feared Germany. Germany was newly unified, and was beating the European powers in population and Industry. France wanted to recover the Alsace-Lorraine. Britain was a country used to being on the ocean, so they felt threatened by Germany\'s colonial expansion and William II\'s insisting on a large navy. Russia and Austria feared pressure on their unstable empires. In 1887 William II refused to renew the Re
Nazism and World War II
Nazism and World War II
Nazism and World War II The National Socialist German Workersí Party almost died one morning in 1919. It numbered only a few dozen grumblersí it had no organization and no political ideas. But many among the middle class admired the Nazisí muscular opposition to the Social Democrats. And the Nazis themes of patriotism and militarism drew highly emotional responses from people who could not forget Germanyís prewar imperial grandeur. In the national elections of September 1930, the Nazis garnered