The Federal Army

WELFARE
WELFARE
WELFARE Welfare is a government program that provides money, medical care, food, housing, and other things that people need in order to survive. People who can receive help from these welfare programs are children, elders, disabled, and others who cannot support their families on their current income. Another name for welfare is public assistance. There are many organizations that supply this public assistance. Such as Salvation Army and other groups. Public assistance benefits help many people
The Presidency of FDR
The Presidency of FDR
The Presidency of FDR In 1932, Americans realized that they had an increasingly great financial problem on their hands, and tried to correct it by centralizing power. The President acquired so much power that the nation almost became a communism, especially with Roosevelt\'s introduction of the New Deal. When Franklin Roosevelt became President of the United States in 1933, the nation was in the depths of the worst depression it had ever experienced. President Roosevelt, a very energetic and ent
Albert Einstein
Albert Einstein
Albert Einstein Of all the scientists to emerge from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries there is one whose name is known by almost all living people. While most of these do not understand this man\'s work, everyone knows that its impact on the world of science is astonishing. Yes, many have heard of Albert Einstein\'s General Theory of relativity, but few know about the intriguing life that led this scientist to discover what some have called, The greatest single achievement of human though
Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass was one of the most important black leaders of the Antislavery movement. He was born in 1817 in Talbot County, MD. He was the son of Harriet Bailey and an unknown white man. His mother was a slave so therefore he was born a slave. He lived with his grandparents until the age of eight, so he never knew his mother well. When he turned eight, he was sent to Aunt Kathy, a woman who took care of slave children on the plantation of Colonel Edward Lloyd. When he
Ulysses S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant Ulysses S. Grant rose to command all the Federal armies in the Civil War and lead them to victory. He was respected so much that he went on to be president of the United States for two terms. His time of glory didn\'t last forever though, he developed cancer and died bankrupt. Ulysses Hiram Grant was born April 27, 1822, in a two room frame house at Point Pleasant, Ohio(Ulysses S. Grant 1). His father, Jesse Root Grant, was foreman in a tannery and a farmer. His mother, Hannah S
Are we civilized?
Are we civilized?
Are we civilized? We are starting to witness the beginning of a new era. It is full of information and technology, and it will decide how the future is going to be. But despite all our new inventions and ideas that show us how we\'re better off than the generations before us, have we grown in any other ways? Does being civilized only mean to become more advanced technologically, or does it apply to our moral foundation? It is very obvious that society has developed a lot in learning and technolo
Dr. Brenda J. Little
Dr. Brenda J. Little
Dr. Brenda J. Little Dr. Brenda J. Little of the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center is the recipient of the 1995 Women in Science and Engineering Award. This award recognizes specific or special scientific or technical contributions by a woman scientist in the Federal service and specific contributions made by a woman scientist toward encouraging young girls and women to pursue science or engineering careers, or enhance employment, promotional or development opportunities for women s
Why Presidentialism is Undesirable in a Newly Foun
Why Presidentialism is Undesirable in a Newly Foun
Why Presidentialism is Undesirable in a Newly Founded Democracy: Brazil\'s Struggle to Liberalize Brazil\'s transformation from an authoritarian regime to a presidential democracy was a slow and faltered attempt. From the early suggestions of democratic development, there were both administrations that contributed to democratic growth, as well as administrations that opposed this liberalization. This led to an instability in the Brazilian form of democratic government, their economy, and their p
100 Years of History
100 Years of History
100 Years of History CURRENT EVENTS: 1945-1996 1945 On April 12 Harry S. Truman became President of the United States of America., In Washington, D.C. On August 6 at 9:15 a.m. US fighter planes dropped an Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima Japan. In Berlin, Germany on April 30, Adolf Hitler was found dead, Hitler committed suicide. 1946 On October 16 in Nurenburg, 9 Nazi war criminals were hanged for the crimes during WW II. On April 25 Big Four Ministers met in Paris to finalize a treaty with Germany, to
Articles of Confederation
Articles of Confederation
Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation was the first constitution of the United States of America. The Articles of Confederation were first drafted by the Continental Congress in Philadelphia Pennsylvania in 1777. This first draft was prepared by a man named John Dickinson in 1776. The Articles were then ratified in 1781. The cause for the changes to be made was due to state jealousies and widespread distrust of the central authority. This jealousy then led to the emasculation o
The Bay of Pigs Invasion
The Bay of Pigs Invasion
The Bay of Pigs Invasion The story of the failed invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs is one of mismanagement, overconfidence, and lack of security. The blame for the failure of the operation falls directly in the lap of the Central Intelligence Agency and a young president and his advisors. The fall out from the invasion caused a rise in tension between the two great superpowers and ironically 34 years after the event, the person that the invasion meant to topple, Fidel Castro, is still in power
The American Civil War
The American Civil War
The American Civil War The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the events surrounding the end of the American Civil War. This war was a war of epic proportion. Never before and not since have so many Americans died in battle. The American Civil War was truly tragic in terms of human life. In this document, I will speak mainly around those involved on the battlefield in the closing days of the conflict. Also, reference will be made to the leading men behind the Union and Confederate forces. Th
Famous People of the Civil War
Famous People of the Civil War
Famous People of the Civil War Ullysses S. Grant Ulysses Simpson Grant served effectively with Zachary Taylor\'s army at Monterey during the Mexican war. Right when the war began Grant obtained a position on the staff of General George McClellan. During the war he showed courage in both physically and morally manners. In February 1862 Grant captured Fort Henry and Fort Donelson with help from the Federal navy. In October he was appointed commander of the Department of Tennessee, and told to take
Why The North Won The Civil War
Why The North Won The Civil War
Why The North Won The Civil War The Confederate South, which is known for its deep military history, proved to be no competition for an industrially sound and hastily growing north in this Civil War. The North that was industrially strong and armed to the teeth found much of their victories quite easily obtainable. Strategy, moral, leadership, and economy are just a few factors that contributed to the Union’s dominance over the confederate succeeded states. The Union won the civil war by economi
Gettysburg
Gettysburg
Gettysburg Fought July 1 through July 3, 1863, considered by most military historians the turning point in the American Civil War. The Battle of Gettysburg was a decisive engagement in that it arrested the Confederates\' second and last major invasion of the North, destroyed their offensive strategy, and forced them to fight a defensive war in which the inadequacies of their manufacturing capacity and transportation facilities doomed them to defeat. The Army of the Potomac, under the Union gener
Gettysburg
Gettysburg
Gettysburg This most famous and most important Civil War Battle occurred over three hot summer days, July 1 to July 3, 1863, around the small market town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It began as a skirmish but by the time it ended, it involved 160,00 Americans. Before the battle, major cities in the North such as Philadelphia, Baltimore and even Washington itself, were under threat of attack from General Robert E. Lee’s Confederate Army of Northern Virginia which had crossed the Potomac River an
Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson Like any hall of fame, its inductees are the best in whatever they do, from baseball or football to something like being President. If you are a member of any hall of fame (including the one for the Presidents), it means that you have done something special or have a certain quality about yourself that makes you worthy to be in a hall of fame. My nominee for the Presidents hall of Fame is our seventh President of the United States, Andrew Jackson. I\'ll go over his presidency, fo
The President
The President
The President Article II of the US Constitution grants the president numerous powers and responsibilities, but the the authority granted to the modern presidency far exceeds the constitutional definition of office. And through the years, a variety of presidential roles have evolved that were not originally or specifically outlined in the Article. Some of these roles were legislated by congress, the courts granted some, and powerful presidents assumed others. The president’s first role is as chie
Decline of the American Empire
Decline of the American Empire
Decline of the American Empire In any era there are different protagonists, playing the same game on a similar board. Like a game of monopoly, there are nations competing to become the foremost leaders of their time. They amass great wealth, powerful armies, and political sway. When the influence and might of these countries transcends the confines of their boundaries, so that they become a presence throughout the world, they become empires. At times, it seems as though one of these empires win
Thomas Woodrow Wilson
Thomas Woodrow Wilson
Thomas Woodrow Wilson Thomas Woodrow Wilson, twenty-eighth president of the United States, might have suffered from dyslexia. He never could read easily, but developed a strong power of concentration and a near-photographic memory. The outbreak of World War I coincided with the death of Wilson\'s first wife Ellen Axson, who he was passionately devoted to. Seven months after her death his friends introduced him to Edith Bolling Galt, a descendant of the Indian princess Pocahontas, they were marri
Fascism and its Political Ideas
Fascism and its Political Ideas
Fascism and its Political Ideas Fascism is a form of counter-revolutionary politics that first arose in the early part of the twentieth-century in Europe. It was a response to the rapid social upheaval, the devastation of World War I, and the Bolshevik Revolution. Fascism is a philosophy or a system of government the advocates or exercises a dictatorship of the extreme right, typically through the merging of state and business leadership, together with an ideology of aggressive nationalism. Cele
The U.S. Constitution
The U.S. Constitution
The U.S. Constitution Article Five, clause two of the United States Constitution states, under the Authority of the United States, [the Constitution] shall be the supreme law of the land. As a result of the fact that the current activist government is pursuing inconsistent policies, many believe the Constitution has become irrelevant because no guiding principles seem to exist. Thomas Jefferson once said, The Constitution belongs to the living and not to the dead. Accordingly, it is often re
Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt Outline Thesis: Theodore Roosevelt\'s political presence altered the course of the United States, transforming it into a superpower fully ready to handle the challenges of any opposition, and changed the role of the president and executive branch of US government, making it a force to be reckoned with. I. Introduction II. Before Roosevelt A. Post-Reconstructionist Views B. The Industrial Revolution C. The Gilded Age 1. Railroads 2. Robber Barons 3. Immigration 4. Standard Ques
UFOs
UFOs
UFOs UFOs: “What are they?” In the past fifty years, UFO sightings have shot up in numbers. Now that there are enough witnesses, we can try to find out what or who these UFOs really are. When asked about the incidents, the government would make something up for an explanation instead of telling the truth. It’s up to people like you and me to find out what really happened. The number of sightings of UFOs in the United States alone is phenomenal. Even though it has been determined that many photog
History of the American Drug War
History of the American Drug War
History of the American Drug War The first act of America\'s anti-drug laws was in 1875. It outlawed the smoking of opium in opium dens. This was a San Francisco ordinance. The basis on passing this law was that Chinese men had a way of luring white women to their dens and causing their ruin, which was the association with Chinese men. Later, other Federal laws such as trafficking in opium was illegal for anyone of Chinese origin. The opium laws were directed at the smoking of opium. The law d
Indian Removal
Indian Removal
Indian Removal INTRODUCTION On May 26, 1830, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 was passed by the Twenty-First Congress of the United states of America. After four months of strong debate, Andrew Jackson signed the bill into law. Land greed was a big reason for the federal government\'s position on Indian removal. This desire for Indian lands was also abetted by the Indian hating mentallity that was peculiar to some American frontiersman. This period of forcible removal first started with the Cherok