The Monasteries Were

Social Control
Social Control
Social Control Both Michel Foucault and Truffaut\'s depiction of a disciplinary society are nearly identical. But Truffaut\'s interpretation sees more room for freedom within the disciplinary society. The difference stems from Foucault\'s belief that the social control in disciplinary pervades all elements of life and there is no escape from this type of control. Foucault\'s work deals mostly with power and his conception of it. Like Nietzsche, Foucault sees power not as a fixed quantity of ph
Monasticism in the Middle Ages
Monasticism in the Middle Ages
Monasticism in the Middle Ages During the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the monasteries served as one of the great civilizing forces by being the centers of education, preservers of learning, and hubs of economic development. Western monasticism was shaped by Saint Benedict of Nursia, who in 529, established a monastery in southern Italy. He created a workable model for running a monastery that was used by most western monastic orders of the Early Middle Ages. To the three vows of obedience,
The Vikings
The Vikings
The Vikings The Vikings liked clothes and jewelry. The Vikings were proud of their appearance and liked to dress well. Most of their clothes were made of wool or linen that they had spun and woven themselves. The cloth was dyed with mineral or vegetable dyes of green, brown, red, yellow or blue. The men wore sleeved jerkins or three-quarter length coats over woolen shirts and long cloth trousers. On their feet they wore tall leather boots or soft shoes with short socks. The women wore long woole