The Poem Eliot

She Walks in Beauty
She Walks in Beauty
She Walks in Beauty George Gordon Noel Byron\'s poem titled, She Walks in Beauty, plainly put, is a love poem about a beautiful woman and all of her features. The poem follows a basic iambic tetrameter with an unaccented syllable followed by an accented syllable that allows for a rhythm to be set by the reader and can be clearly seen when one looks at a line: She walks / in beau / ty like / the night. T.S. Eliot, an American poet criticizes Byron\'s work by stating the poem, needs to be re
Ceremonies in The Waste Land
Ceremonies in The Waste Land
Ceremonies in The Waste Land Ceremonies are prevalent throughout T.S. Eliotís poem The Waste Land. Eliot relies on literary contrasts to illustrate the specific values of meaningful, effectual rituals of primitive society in contrast to the meaningless, broken, sham rituals of the modern day. These contrasts serve to show how ceremonies can become broken when they are missing vital components, or they are overloaded with too many. Even the way language is used in the poem furthers the point
Characteristic Downfall
Characteristic Downfall
Characteristic Downfall In T.S. Eliot\'s The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, the author is establishing the trouble the narrator is having dealing with middle age. Prufrock(the narrator) believes that age is a burden and is deeply troubled by it.. His love of some women cannot be because he feels the prime of his life is over. His preoccupation with the passing of time characterizes the fear of aging he has. The poemdeals with the aging and fears associated with it of the narrator. Prufrock
Title of Paper : The Hippopotamus is not a Churc
Title of Paper : The Hippopotamus is not a Churc
Title of Paper : The Hippopotamus is not a Church Grade Received on Report : 100 The Hippopotamus is not a Church In The Hippopotamus, T. S. Eliot uses irony and contrasting metaphors to illustrate the secularity of the Christian Church and the spirituality of mankind. It is a satirical look at the establishment of Christianity. The hippopotamus in the poem is a metaphor for mankind and the True Church is a metaphor for Christianity. There are several sharp ironies that emphasize the dicho